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Category: programming

SPSS syntax: define numerics, strings and multiline comments

SPSS syntax: define numerics, strings and multiline comments

In SPSS you can program datasets in the SPSS syntax language. Unfortunately a lot of people working with SPSS do not really know how to use these syntax commands. A common way of using syntax is just do a “copy/paste” but barely knowing what the code really does. In order to solve this issue these series of SPSS syntax tutorials show, and explain how SPSS syntax can be used.

This tutorial is about how to define multiline comments, numeric and string variables in SPSS syntax code.

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Installing Ruby on Ubuntu Server with Mechanize gem

Installing Ruby on Ubuntu Server with Mechanize gem

I wanted to use Ruby on my server for several scripts (one of these uses the Mechanize gem). It turned out it was quite some mission to get this done. Therefore I wrote a small tutorial so you don’t have to spend so much time in finding solutions.

FYI, Mechanize is a library which simulates a browser, including history, forms etc. Quite useful for coding crawlers, but as well for automated form submitting.

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Getting started with Ruby

Getting started with Ruby

I am currently exploring the possibilities of Ruby. Since this programming language is completely new to me I was looking for some quick hands-on tutorial. Via the Ruby site I found this online interactive tutorial which teaches you the very basics of Ruby. Another nice tutorial is the written tutorial “Ruby in twenty minutes” which can be viewed here.

If you are familiar with other programming languages like PHP, Java, Perl, Python, C or C++ you might want to check out this page, which provides an overview of the differences between Ruby and these languages.

Ruby can be downloaded from this page and is available for Windows, OSX and Linux. For OSX users: if you have Xcode installed there is no need to install Ruby again since Ruby comes with Xcode. Just open a console and type:

$ ruby myscript.rb

In order to execute myscript.rb.